WOTH NO. 8

PEOPLE to MEET | PLACES to BE | THINGS to KNOW
5 interviews | 1 portfolio | 4 interiors | 1 city | 4 workshops | Architecture | & WOTHSON – many design events

Far away yet intriguingly familiar. WOTH n08 embraces the fruitful crossovers between Dutch designers and craftsmen in Arita, brandstores in Tokyo, hotels and museums around Japan. Featuring interviews with Richard Hutten, Stefan Scholten of Scholten Baijings and Sayaka Yamomoto of BCXSY + a 10 page graphic powerportfolio by Sigrid Calon, designer known from the SuperGeometric interior of the Uniqlo flagship store in New York. The extensive photo-journal of Iwan Baan delivers two lengthy travelreports discovering the serene beauty of Japan, it’s landscape and architecture by Sui Fujimoto, Toyo Ito and SANAA. Clean lines always need stark contrasts; we think. So delve into the patterns and colors of the Paris apartment of illustrator Pierre Marie Agin or the Prenzlauer haus of the Kubishik family (Berlin). Our WOTHSON calendar selects the most exiting exhibitions on design, craft, multimedia and arts currently showing in museums around the world. If it’s content that really makes you tick (cleverly written, enticingly crafted and well printed): start considering WOTH Wonderful Things Magazine seriously. WOW

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content woth no. 8
INTERVIEW ENG2
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Interview LucyKoldova ENG2
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BLOSSOM!

Japan. I didn’t really think it was my cup of tea. I’m rather blunt, and that’s not the best mix with the reticent Japanese mentality. And I’m a collector, which is hardly in accordance with the  minimalist and orderly Japanese lifestyle (think of Marie Kondo’s success). But I do have a passion for beautiful things. I don’t own a single object that’s ‘just’ practical! So that’s one thing that we can agree on, Japan and I. Another thing we unmistakably have in common is a love for blossoms. The best thing about our house is the magnolia in the patio. It’s a deep, deep pink variety, called 'Heaven Sent'. It blossoms every spring – only for two weeks, but the flowers are rich and exuberant. I like to sit at the window to enjoy every minute. I love that tree.

And then there’s the fashion . . .

In the 1980s we were inundated by the first Japanese wave of designers such as Rei Kawakubo (Comme des Garçons), Issey Miyake, Kenzo and Yoji Yamamoto. Interesting shapes. Miyake’s ‘Pleats Please’ was certainly a game changer, albeit a bit of a strict concept. In 2018, Japan seems synonymous with a much softer approach. Think of Nendo, Muji and Arita 2016. In architecture, curvaceous organic forms provide breath-taking buildings! That was my discovery in this issue. Iwan Baan’s photographs show the most wondrous places, sprouted from the brains of architects – or are they visionaries?! In Japan, nothing is built for eternity, owing to the astronomical price of the land. This stimulates creativity to the utmost. A lot of people I know return home from a visit to Japan full of enthusiasm. That’s contagious. We’re lucky to have just set up a travel arrangement with Talisman. It’s high time to test our own goods. During the blossom season, please!

— Foreword founding editor
Mary Hessing


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